Christian Virtues in Dystopian Fiction

Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, George Orwell’s 1984, Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, Lois Lowry’s The Giver, Sinclair Lewis’ It Can’t Happen Here, Philip K. Dick’s Minority Report. Dystopian fiction. That brand of sci-fi that imagines a future world in which the powers that be—usually overzealous, overpowerful governments—have taken radical steps to ensure the well-being of […]

Unhappy Endings

Most of us will readily acknowledge the value inherent in the Happy Ending. Christians particularly make much of it, and I’ve discussed in numerous other places how stories with such endings reflect the ultimate realities of our universe. But what about unhappy endings? Is a story that lacks clear redemption—or in which a character’s misfortunes are […]

Thinking Your Life Away

Two boys stand on the cusp of manhood. Each also stands at the edge of a body of water. And each struggles intensely to make a very simple decision: Do I jump in? Or do I stay on dry land where I can observe everyone else jumping in? Preoccupation with the choice consumes them. One […]

Last-minute Book Recommendations

For those of you still scrambling—or just starting to scramble—to find gifts for your book loving friends, here’s one final round of recommendations. * * * Recommended by Garret Johnson: JRR Tolkien: The Letters of JRR Tolkien – Edited by Humphrey Carpenter with the assistance of Christopher Tolkien: Part autobiography, part theory-of-everything, part treatise on the author’s […]

Think Christianly: Looking at the Intersection of Faith and Culture by Jonathan Morrow – Book Review

In this review for Apologetics315, I look at Jonathan Morrow’s timely and valuable book, Think Christianly: Looking at the Intersection of Faith and Culture. Morrow writes in the introduction: “I deeply believe that to become who God calls us to be, we must move in our thinking from isolation to integration. Christianity, if true, requires […]

Review: Darwin’s God by Cornelius G. Hunter, Ph.D.

In his book Darwin’s God, Cornelius Hunter sets forth a compelling thesis: that Darwinian evolution came about largely as a theodicy and continues to depend more heavily upon theological underpinnings than scientific particulars. Hunter concludes, “Ultimately, evolution is about God” (Hunter, 175). I should pause here and define the term “theodicy.” Whenever we observe the […]